Georgia DUI attorney

Why Motions Are Important in a DUI Case

One of my recent cases shows why it is so important to consider filing a “Motion to Suppress” in every Driving Under the Influence (DUI) case. Many attorneys structure their fees to always include a motion to suppress. I don’t normally do this, because there may be some cases where even a motion to suppress is not called for, and in those cases, a defendant may pay more than necessary to resolve their case.

That being said, however, in MOST DUI cases it might be worth the money to consider filing a motion to suppress.

What is a Motion to Suppress?

A Motion to Suppress is a legal pleading which asks the Court to either throw out the case or throw out (suppress) evidence such as the State Breath Test.  While the vast majority of motions to suppress are not granted, the mere fact of forcing the State’s witnesses to show up for court always renders the possibility of good things happening for a Defendant.

I tell my clients there are three potentially positive outcomes of going forward with a hearing on a Motion to Suppress:

  1. The State’s witnesses don’t show and you either win the case or force the State to offer a reduction of the charges.
  2. The State’s witnesses do show, and you are able to cross-examine them just like you would at a trial, which opens the possibility for some or all of the case to be thrown out.
  3. Even if the Court denies the Motion, it can sometimes show the State that their witness doesn’t testify as well as perhaps they would like, which gives the State pause to consider whether to go forward with the charges or offer a reduction.

How a Motion to Suppress Helped My Client

On this recent case, I had filed a Motion to Suppress which included a request to exclude a breath test due to 4th Amendment search issues. While the “stopping” officer did appear at the hearing, the arresting officer and breath test operator failed to show up.  The Court indicated  that it would not grant the State’s request for a continuance, meaning that if the hearing went forward, the State would not be able to prove the officer had “probable cause” for the arrest, and the entire case would be thrown out.  Of course, the State could have also dismissed the case and re-accused the client within six months.

Based on the above, my client accepted an offer to plead to a reduced charge, which kept him from losing his job and also kept his license from being suspended.

A lawyer should consider a Motion to Suppress in every DUI case, although quite frankly, many attorneys rarely file these motions. That is why it is so important to hire a lawyer who is qualified and experienced specifically in DUI defense.

Driving Habits That Could Lead to a DUI Arrest

Unless a police officer smells your breath as you drive by, he or she will have to rely on visual cues based on your driving behavior to determine whether you are driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol. Most people know that fast, reckless driving can indicate DUI, but you may not know that some seemingly innocent driving habits can lead to a traffic stop and potentially a DUI arrest. If you’ve been drinking at all – even if you’re not over the legal limit of .08 – these driving behaviors can give police officers probable cause to stop and even arrest you.
should you take test after dui arrest

Improper Acceleration & Braking
We’ve all been in the car with a stop-and-go driver whose jerky braking nearly causes whiplash. It can be irritating, but it can also get you pulled over on suspicion of DUI. Drivers who have been drinking mimic the behavior of such a driver; braking too late or too soon, accelerating sharply for no apparent reason, and failing to maintain a reasonably constant rate of speed are all signs of DUI.

Carelessness
It happens to everyone: the driver in front of you suddenly begins slowing down, almost stopping, and then abruptly makes a turn. “Nice blinker,” you mutter. Or maybe you’re on the interstate, where most drivers are doing north of 70 mph, and see someone change lanes without signaling. It’s obviously dangerous, but failing to signal can also signal to cops that you may be under the influence. The same is true for forgetting to turn on headlights when it’s dark, raining, or foggy or taking longer than normal to respond to traffic signals, such as a light change from red to green.

Poor Judgment
Did you know that tailgating can be an indicator of impaired driving? It’s tempting to “ride” someone who’s driving more slowly than you’d like, but following too closely can get you pulled over on suspicion of DUI. Other examples of poor judgment include rapid and frequent lane changes, especially in dangerously narrow spaces, and turning too sharply, broadly, quickly, or slowly.

Failing to Maintain Lane Position
It’s critical to stay in your lane while driving for both your safety and the safety of other drivers. Failure to do so could result in a traffic stop and subsequent DUI charge. Weaving, straddling a line (a common practice among sober drivers in rural areas with very little traffic and road lighting), swerving, and drifting on a curve are just a few examples.
If you find yourself arrested and charged with DUI – no matter whether or how much you’ve been drinking – get in touch with an attorney with extensive experience in handling Georgia DUI cases. As an attorney with over 33 years of experience handling both DUI and traffic-law cases, I urge you to contact me, Mickey Roberts, and to follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+ for all the latest in DUI news and laws.

5 Questions to Ask When Hiring a DUI Lawyer

It’s an understatement to say that being arrested for driving under the influence (DUI) can be an overwhelming experience. Even in the first moments, you begin to consider what the next step should be.  According to Georgia DUI attorney Mickey Roberts, the logical next step is to find a great lawyer who can address your case effectively and professionally. Below, he provides five key points that should be brought up when selecting your DUI attorney.

  1. Don’t be afraid to ask questions. Thoroughly learn the lawyer’s background and experience. Inquire about where they attended law school and their time of graduation, as well any membership in bar organizations and length of practice.
  1. Get a feel for their client base. How long has the lawyer been representing clients facing DUI? Is it their specialty, or just something done on the side? How many clients are represented each year?
  1. Their success is your business. Ask about their success rate within the court, and welcome feedback on your case so they can understand the charges and if they believe they can take you on as a client. If you’re satisfied with the amount of cases won, it’s a good indicator that this is a trustworthy lawyer for you.
  1. Assess your case. Lay out the details of your arrest and the charges you’re currently facing. Ask the lawyer what they would recommend in terms of a guilty plea or trial. Request for them to lay out the factors in your case that work in your favor or against you to determine how the DUI lawyer will aggressively defend you in court.
  1. Consider the cost. Yes, DUI arrests can be expensive. But think about the possible outcomes: you could lose your driver’s license, experience an increase in insurance premiums, DUI school, fines, and possible jail time. And of course it costs money to hire a lawyer.

After meeting with your potential attorney, evaluate. Consider what you heard about their experience, success rates, and applicable fees. Do your research. If you believe the attorney will fight hard for your case and value your triumph over your charges, hire them! To contact a reputable DUI in Georgia, call Mickey Roberts. Be sure to follow Mickey Roberts on FacebookTwitter, and Google+ for traffic law updates and news.

Are You a First Time DUI Offender? Here’s What You Should Do Next

Your first DUI arrest can be an anxious time. You have just endured being arrested, handcuffed and taken to jail—probably not the fun time you imagined upon heading out for the night. If you are wondering what typically happens in your case, let Georgia DUI attorney Mickey Roberts lead you to the path of successfully dealing with DUIs when it’s your first time.

arrested for dui
First, it is important to hire an experienced DUI lawyer who has a reputation in the legal community as aggressively and successfully defending DUIs. It’s important to acquire a lawyer who also has long standing professional relationships with police officers, judges, and prosecutors.

When you were arrested for DUI, you should receive a citation for your DUI charges which will have your initial court date on it. You may also have received a “1205 form”, which is a 30 day permit to drive and is also notice that the State will try to suspend your license BEFORE your court date.

Once you have hired an experienced lawyer, a “10 day” letter will be sent to Driver’s Services immediately, which will keep your license valid past the first 30 day period. Additionally, an “open records request” to the State will be sent, requesting all of the evidence they have that relates to your case. Once the evidence is received, a report which outlines any possible defenses and the recommendations on how to proceed with your case will be sent. The initial goal of your lawyer is to look for any possible means to win your case, giving you enough information upon which you can make an informed decision on how to proceed.

At some point in time you’ll be given several options, which will include pleading guilty, pleading to a “lesser offense”, or fighting your case with either a bench or jury trial.  Mickey Roberts can help you make a decision by also providing you with information relative to license suspension, possible sentence and possible ramifications with changes to your driving record and license, insurance, employment loss.

Not only can hiring a qualified, knowledgeable DUI attorney be beneficial to winning your case, it can also make the process less confusing. If you are arrested for DUI or other serious traffic matters, contact MrGaDUI today. Also be sure to follow Mickey Roberts on FacebookTwitter, and Google+ for more traffic law updates and news.

March’s Case of the Month: How an Underage DUI Became a Simple MIP

This month’s case shows the value of having an experienced DUI attorney who has a reputation for aggressively defending cases.  In an Athens-Clarke County case, my UGA student client was in a Pre Trial Diversion for a previous Minor in Possession (MIP) of Alcohol charge when he was arrested by Athens police and charged with DUI.

case of the monthSo now, he had a DUI charge and the old MIP charge pending in Athens. Unsurprisingly, the police report had my client as being intoxicated, but after reviewing the video, I thought otherwise of the evidence.

The cop had stopped my client for a broken taillight, yet the cop was approaching my client, and it would have been extremely difficult for the cop to actually see a broken taillight. The video revealed my client’s physical appearance to be normal. My client denied drinking and refused a breath test after arrest. Any clues on the Field Sobriety Evaluations were minimal.

Nonetheless, because the client was under 21 at the time of the arrest, any evidence of him having consumed alcohol could have resulted in a guilty verdict. We employed the use of an expert in Field Evaluations who agreed with me that the evidence was slim and was known and respected by the prosecutor. Eventually, we negotiated a plea to 2 MIPs, allowing my client to continue driving and to not have a DUI conviction on his record.

One more thing: We structured the plea so that the MIP pleas would not result in a suspension of client’s license. (He could have had a 1 year suspension!)  It is important that a traffic lawyer knows how to structure pleas for the best possible outcome, and this means the lawyer must have a thorough knowledge of Georgia Traffic Laws.

If you are arrested for DUI or other traffic violations, contact Mr. GaDUI today. Also be sure to follow me, Mickey Roberts on FacebookTwitter, and Google+ for more traffic law updates and news.

What Happens When You Are Arrested for DUI?

Whether you have been arrested for DUI (Driving under the Influence) for the first time or multiple times, you may be wondering how the DUI process works and exactly what you should be doing NOW.  Below, DUI attorney Mickey Roberts details step-by-step what happens when you’re stopped for suspicion of DUI.



  1. After suspicion or probable cause (for example, operating your vehicle in an unusual or illegal manner), an officer stops your vehicle and requests you to pull over before obtaining your driver’s license, vehicle registration, and insurance card.
  2. After providing the police with your license and insurance, tell the officer you are invoking your 4th Amendment rights. Also tell him/her that you are invoking your 5th Amendment rights as well.
  3. If the officer suspects you are under the influence of alcohol, you will be asked to submit to field sobriety tests such as horizontal gaze, walk-and-turn, and the one-leg stand evaluations.
  4. Following the field sobriety tests, if the officer suspects nothing, you will be released. However, if the officer has probable cause, you will be placed under DUI arrest and taken to the police station. You will be asked to submit chemical testing of breath, blood, or urine.
  5. … Do NOT refuse to take the State chemical tests UNLESS you have had enough alcohol to be above the .08 limit. If you refuse to take the test, your license could be suspended for one year.
  6. If you are under 21, or this is not your first DUI in five years, it is recommended that you refuse to take any state chemical test of blood, breath, or urine. Otherwise, request a blood test and independent breath test with another police department immediately after arrest, and then take the state test(s). Do not refuse to the take the State test outright or your license will be suspended for one year.
  7. Once in custody, invoke your right to an attorney—however, you are not guaranteed the right to call an attorney for advice on a roadside stop. Memorize and print your legal rights NOW to avoid problems at the scene.
  8. You are required to post bond and may be incarcerated until bond is posted.
  9. Your vehicle may be towed, impounded, or seized.
  10. Keep in mind: If you register over .08 on the state chemical test or refuse completion, you only have ten business days from the arrest to request a hearing from the department of Public Safety before your driver’s license will be inevitably suspended.





Stay tuned for a blog coming soon for more on what happens after your arrest. If you are arrested for DUI or other traffic violations, contact Mr. GaDUI today. Also be sure to follow me, Mickey Roberts on FacebookTwitter, and Google+ for more traffic law updates and news.



The Importance of Doing “Nothing”

My last two DUI case wins show the importance of doing “nothing.”  While there are many self-help books and articles going around that emphasize the importance of being able to do nothing when alleviating stressful situations, the same advice should be applied when you are stopped for DUI.




dui-in-georgiaThe important thing to understand is that during any police stop, the officer, in asking you questions and asking you to perform certain “field sobriety evaluations,” is in reality attempting to gather evidence which he can use against you at trial. Therefore, even a seemingly harmless admission of drinking can be used against you.




In one of my DUI cases this month, my client ran through a stop sign obscured by a tree limb; she actually had only consumed one glass of wine.  She never admitted drinking anything, never took the field tests, and refused to take a State chemical test. As a result, the DUI was dismissed.




In another case, my client was stopped for failure to wear a seat belt; he did admit to having a couple of beers at the Braves game.  However, he did NOT do any field tests, nor did he take the State chemical tests. As a result, his DUI was also dismissed.




In another case I had a client stopped who admitted drinking a couple of beers. She agreed to submit to field tests; however, the video showed the field tests were administered incorrectly by the officer.  My client, however, then agreed to take a State breath test at the jail and registered a .13 (above the legal limit of .08). Had she refused to take the State breath test, the DUI charges more than likely would have been reduced to reckless driving charges.




It seems to go against human nature to do “nothing.” Not only in DUI stops, but in most areas of our lives we feel the need to do something.  My advice is to cultivate the habit of doing nothing. It just might help if you find yourself charged with a DUI.




For more DUI arrest advice you can connect with me on Facebook, Twitter and Google+.  Keep reading the MRGADUI blog for the latest traffic law news.

Rates of Female DUI Increase throughout the Last Decade

A recent study published by The Century Council and the Traffic Injury Research Foundation shows that the number of females arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol has increased 36% over a decade. The report, which will be available in full later this month, states that while men are often seen as the primary offenders in drunk driving cases, the number of women involved has increased steadily since 1980 and was up 29% from 1997 to 2007.

Researchers examining the phenomenon offer various explanations for this spike in female DUI statistics. One theory is that more women are drinking and then driving than in past years. Some researchers believe that the spike in women’s arrests is due to changes in the legal system including fewer male arrests and changes to the DUI law enforcement policy that bring more attention to women whose blood alcohol content levels are more affected by alcohol consumption.

The study indicated, More

Designed to Fail? MR GA DUI Advises Against Submitting to Field Sobriety Tests

If you own a MR GA DUI koozie or read his blog, you’ve probably heard that he suggests not submitting to field sobriety tests when stopped by the police for driving under the influence. While experienced DUI attorney Mickey Roberts has been advising clients and Georgia drivers not to submit to field sobriety tests for years, an investigative reporter for Atlanta’s Channel 2 Action News, Richard Belcher, further solidified Robert’s advice in a recent news story.

Belcher spoke with police officers, as well as Dr. Spurgeon Cole, a retired psychology professor from Clemson University, who has been studying field sobriety tests since the 1980s shortly after the tests were first instituted. Cole told the Channel 2 reporter that when these tests were designed, police incorrectly identified 47% of the drivers as intoxicated during trials. However, More

4 Simple Rules Explained: Rule 2

mrgaduiRule 2 is: DON’T SUBMIT TO ANY ROADSIDE FIELD SOBRIETY TESTS

Once the officer has asked you to step out of your car, he is going to then ask if you would mind doing some “field sobriety tests.” Sometimes the officer will phrase it this way: “Do you mind taking some roadside evaluations to make sure you are ok to drive?”

My experience is that MOST people agree to take the roadside evaluations because they believe that by More